HONORING THEIR MEMORY

About the Foundation

Letter from the Chairman

Dear Friends,

Very few know that Philadelphia’s Monument to the Six Million Jewish Martyrs was the first public Holocaust memorial in the United States—a pioneering monument from 1964 that conveyed to the world the importance of Holocaust remembrance to ensure that this tragedy is never repeated. The original sculpture on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway was commissioned by a group of Holocaust survivors, and prominent business and community leaders. More than fifty years later their legacy continues as the Philadelphia Holocaust Remembrance Foundation is joined by business and community leaders to undertake the expansion of the Holocaust Memorial Plaza. The completely redesigned Plaza will be a thought-provoking and engaging civic space dedicated to remembrance and education.

I lead the work of the Philadelphia Holocaust Remembrance Foundation to honor the memory of my grandfather who survived the Holocaust, but lost his first wife and children in the Sobibor death camp. He didn’t just survive—he fought back, escaping the camp, fighting the rest of the war as a partisan and somehow finding the strength to build a new life and family in America. Seven decades after the Holocaust, many of us go about our daily lives thinking that Nazi-style hatred and prejudice are things of the past. They are not. American democracy can protect us if we stay vigilant and active in support of our diverse communities and values. With this need in mind we are building a Memorial Plaza around the original monument on the iconic Benjamin Franklin Parkway.

The Memorial Plaza will be nondenominational, offering a universal message of tolerance and hope. The creation of the Plaza is a project for humanity.

We are inspired by the outpouring of support from our local and national communities and invite you to join our cause.

Gratefully,

David Adelman
Chairman, Philadelphia Holocaust Remembrance Foundation
CEO, Campus Apartments

This Holocaust Memorial Plaza belongs where it is — in Philadelphia — because Philadelphia stands for freedom.